5G Spectrum Sharing: A Network Economics View

25 May 2022, 15:00 - 16:30 - Eastern Daylight Time (UTC - 04:00)

The evolution of commercial wireless networks to 5G and beyond will continue to increase the demands for wireless spectrum. Traditionally, commercial wireless service providers have utilized spectrum that is exclusively licensed to them. Moving forward, these networks will increasingly operate in spectrum that is shared including utilizing unlicensed spectrum and the tiered sharing approach recently adopted for the Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) adopted for sharing the 3.5 GHZ band with incumbent users. The success of these approaches is in turn tightly coupled to the economic impact they have on the competition between wireless service providers. In this talk we will discuss a framework for gaining insight into these impacts based on game theoretic models for competition with congestible resources. We will utilize this framework to illustrate potential impacts of different emerging sharing scenarios.

About Our Speaker: Randall Berry, Northwestern University

Randall Berry, HeadshotRandall Berry joined Northwestern University in 2000, where he is currently the Chair and John A. Dever Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research interests span topics in wireless communications, computer networking, network economics, and information theory. Dr. Berry received the M.S. and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1996 and 2000, respectively, where he was part of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. His undergraduate education was at the University of Missouri-Rolla, where he received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1993. In 1998 he was on the technical staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in the Advanced Networks Group and currently is a Principle Engineer with Roberson and Associates. 

Dr. Berry is the recipient of a 2003 CAREER award from the National Science Foundation.  He has served as an Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications from 2006 to 2009, and an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory from 2009 to 2011. He has also been a guest editor for the IEEE Journal on Selected Topics in Signal Processing special issue on Dynamic Spectrum Access and the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory special issue on Relaying and Cooperation. He has served on the program and organizing committees of numerous conferences including serving as the co-chair of the 2012 IEEE Communication Theory Workshop and a technical co-chair of 2010 IEEE ICC Wireless Networking Symposium. He was elevated to IEEE Fellow in 2014 for contributions to resource allocation and interference management in wireless networks.