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Encoding Quantum Information in Temporal Modes of Light

Hosted By: Optics in Digital Systems Technical Group

25 August 2023 11:00 - 12:00

Eastern Time (US & Canada) (UTC -05:00)

In this webinar hosted by the Optics in Digital Systems Technical Group, Michael Raymer will review the concept of temporal modes in quantum optics and their growing importance in quantum information science.

Temporal modes are orthogonal sets of wave packets that can be used to represent a multimode light field. They are temporal counterparts to transverse spatial modes of light and play analogous roles - decomposing multimode light into the most natural basis for isolating statistically independent degrees of freedom. As such, they play an increasingly important role in constructing quantum information networks.

What You Will Learn:
• The quantum description of light in various kinds of mode structures
• The ways in which quantum information can be encoded in temporal modes
• How such encodings can be used in quantum information networks

Who Should Attend:
• Those with knowledge of quantum theory at the advanced undergraduate level or higher
• Those with interest in details of quantum information networks

About the Presenter: Michael G. Raymer from the University of Oregon

Michael Raymer is a University of Oregon Physics Professor and the author of the book Quantum Physics: What Everyone Needs to Know. He earned a PhD at the University of Colorado Boulder. He was the founding Director of the Oregon Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science. He was instrumental in the passage of the U.S. National Quantum Initiative Act in 2018, and recently was appointed as founding Chief Editor of the new journal, ‘Optica Quantum’. His current research includes the coherent manipulation of single-photon states for use in quantum communication systems and quantum sensors, including distributed telescope arrays and the use of two-photon entangled states for probing the structure of molecular systems of chemical and biological interest. 

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