2022 Siegman International School on Lasers

25 June 2022 – 02 July 2022

University of Warsaw, Chęciny, Poland

Andrew Weiner

Purdue University, USA

Ultrafast Photonics Time-Frequency Signal Processing: Classical and Quantum

These lectures introduce analog signal processing approaches for manipulation of broadband and ultrafast optical signals. The first lecture focuses on pulse shaping and classical applications in ultrafast optics and radio-frequency photonics. The second lecture focuses on quantum applications, including manipulation and measurement of broadband time-energy entangled photons.
These lectures introduce analog signal processing approaches for manipulation of broadband and ultrafast optical signals. The first lecture focuses on pulse shaping and classical applications in...

Frank Wise

Cornell University, USA

Generation of Ultrashort Pulses in Fiber Lasers

Short-pulse (picosecond and femtosecond) fiber lasers have increasing impact in applications, owing to their practical benefits. The combination of a waveguide medium and diode pumping allows the design of robust, high-power (above 1000 watts) instruments. However, the waveguide medium also enhances nonlinear optical effects, and these often limit the performance of short-pulse fiber lasers. The goal of these lectures is to provide an introduction to short-pulse generation in fiber lasers and amplifiers. The lectures will begin with a tutorial and introductory description of the fundamental linear and nonlinear processes that underlie short-pulse generation in optical fiber. The most-important techniques for short-pulse generation will be discussed, and the performance will be compared to that offered by other technologies. The lectures will end with a brief introduction to recent advances in this area.
Short-pulse (picosecond and femtosecond) fiber lasers have increasing impact in applications, owing to their practical benefits. The combination of a waveguide medium and diode pumping allows the...

Grzegorz Soboń

Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland

Compact Near- and Mid-Infrared Optical Frequency Combs Based on Fiber Lasers

An optical frequency comb (OFC), introduced in the late 90’s of the XX century has revolutionized the field of precise measurements of time, frequency and dimensions. The “heart” of the frequency comb – a mode-locked laser, forms in the spectral domain a regular structure of thousands of modes, equally spaced by the pulse repetition frequency. Optical frequency combs have enabled the development of e.g. ultra-precise optical-atomic clocks, which are currently the most accurate known time standards. They find applications in precise frequency measurements, laser spectroscopy, precise dimensional metrology, or calibration of spectrographs for extra-solar planet search. They have also emerged as ideal sources for molecular spectroscopy, due to their high brightness, broad spectral coverage and compatibility with enhancement cavities. Laser-based detection of most important molecules (e.g. greenhouse gases, explosives, air pollutants, etc.) requires a source which covers the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral region, where the strongest fundamental vibrational transitions are present. The development of robust and field-deployable gas detection platforms relies on the development of compact, environmentally stable laser sources. The lecture will cover the fundamentals and recent achievements of in near- and mid-infrared fiber-based frequency combs and their applications, especially in molecular spectroscopy and greenhouse gas sensing.
An optical frequency comb (OFC), introduced in the late 90’s of the XX century has revolutionized the field of precise measurements of time, frequency and dimensions. The “heart” of the frequency...

Hui Cao

Yale University, USA

Physics and Application of Complex Lasers

Over the past sixty years, lasers have enabled major scientific and technological advancements, and have been exploited in numerous applications due to their advantages such as high brightness and high coherence. However, the high spatial coherence of laser illumination is not always desirable, as it can cause adverse artifacts such as speckle noise in imaging applications. Furthermore, the high-power broad-area lasers often suffer spatio-temporal instabilities that result from nonlinear interactions between the lasing modes and the active materials. We have developed novel lasers to suppress the spatio-temporal instabilities and to tune the spatial coherence of laser emission. Laser coherence control not only provides an efficient means for eliminating coherent artifacts, but also enables new applications.
Over the past sixty years, lasers have enabled major scientific and technological advancements, and have been exploited in numerous applications due to their advantages such as high brightness and...

Jelena Pesic

Nokia Bell Labs, France

High Speed Optical Networks; Boosting Optical Network Operation with Machine Learning

Maciej Wojtkowski

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Poland

From organs to cells - the challenges of modern biomedical imaging

One of the still unresolved problems in biological and medical imaging is the possibility of non-invasive visualization of living tissue (latin in vivo) with the accuracy of microscopic examination. This is particularly emphasized in the age of innovative microscopic techniques, which have the ability to optically select axial layers without the need to take and prepare samples. The main physical limitation of in vivo microscopic imaging is related to the light scattering introduced by the irregular and often discontinuous distribution of the refractive index. Light scattering induces strong modulation of the wavefront of the light back-scattered from the sample. As a consequence, the contrast of the reconstructed images is dramatically decreased by increased noise. Other side effects of the uneven distribution of the refractive index are significant deformations of measured objects on the reconstructed images. In addition, in the case of consistent laser illumination, there are so-called speckles - strong changes in the intensity of recorded light caused by interference of transverse modes of the laser beam. Speckle noise adversely affects system resolution and reduces image quality. Adding all these effects results in a serious loss of image information. In our work we try to solve these basic physical limitations by developing new imaging techniques that use partially coherent light with spatial-time modulation of the phase of the radiation used. Our research activities focus on developing new optical methods that enable biological objects to be imaged live and in a minimally invasive manner. We have come a long way in developing techniques for imaging objects of different sizes - from the scale of organs to the internal structure of a single cell.
One of the still unresolved problems in biological and medical imaging is the possibility of non-invasive visualization of living tissue (latin in vivo) with the accuracy of microscopic examination...

Ursula Keller

ETH Zurich

Xian-Min Jin

Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Scalable Photonic Quantum Technologies with Quantum Chip and Quantum Memory

Photons can be generated, manipulated and detected comparatively easier than other quantum particles, and can be transferred in a long distance without coupling with the environment. However, the limitations of bulk optics and inefficiencies of quantum sources and operations prevent photonic quantum technologies from realizing in practice. Integrated photonics, associated with quantum memory, provides an elegant way to scale up quantum systems. In my talk, I will present our endeavors recently delivered in femtosecond laser direct writing, 3D photonic quantum chip, broadband room-temperature quantum memory, and their applications in quantum computing and quantum simulation.
Photons can be generated, manipulated and detected comparatively easier than other quantum particles, and can be transferred in a long distance without coupling with the environment. However, the...

Andrew White

University of Queensland, Australia

Workshop Leaders

  • Carlos Lopez Mariscal, Appalachian State University, USA